Art

Highlights from Dhaka Art Summit

07 February 2018Alserkal Avenue
Highlights from Dhaka Art Summit
Highlights from Dhaka Art Summit
Highlights from Dhaka Art Summit

Founded in 2012, the Dhaka Art Summit (DAS) looks at art and architecture related to South Asia, with a core focus on Bangladesh. It was started by the Samdan Art Foundation in collaboration with Ministry of Cultural Affairs, People’s Republic of Bangladesh. 

Now in its fourth edition, which takes place from 2 to 10 February, DAS has extended its programming and widened its focus to links between South and Southeast Asia, as well as the Indian Ocean belt.  This year, DAS highlights inter-Asian modes of exchange, featuring over 300 artists. 

Here, we share a few moments from Dhaka Art Summit's opening. 

The summit kicked off with an opening performance of Harano Sur (Lost Tune), by Reetu Sattar. This melodic performance was created by 30 musicians who played simultaneously in the scaffolding around the entrance to the Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy, playing music that was familiar and nostalgic to those who grew up in South Asia. The performance was part of A Utopian Stage, curated by Vali Mahlouji and supported by Alserkal Programming and was co-commisioned by the Samdani Art Foundation and Liverpool Biennial.

“Architecture must inspire the people, for whom it is built, by creating spaces that incite the finer, more glorious aspects of the mind”. Muzhural Islam, Bangladeshi architect and urbanist. This philosophy provided much of the impetus behind Bearing Point, a series of five large thematic presentations, curated by Diana Campbell Betancourt, Chief Curator of Dhaka Art Summit. This image is from Seher Shah (represented by Green Art Gallery) and Randhir Singh’s collaborative commissioned solo project, Studies in Form, using cyanotypes (which were used for the reproduction of architectural drawings) to produce études of architectural moments from the mid-20th century.  

Planetary Planning, curated by Devita Singh, includes the work of artists whose trajectory has been marked by travel and migration. 

Hera Büyüktaşçıyan (represented by Green Art Gallery)’s practice weaves connections between identity, memory, space and time.  In Reconstructors, 2017, Hera has investigated the global economy of marble labour and unearthed the stories of anonymous builders that are often forgotten behind well-known commissioners.